Katya Mack



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Research Overview

I am broadly interested in the genetic basis of speciation and the role of gene expression in phenotypic divergence between species. I am particularly interested in identifying and understanding negative epistatic gene interactions that result in hybrid inviability and infertility.

As an undergraduate at the University of Michigan, I worked in Dr. Patricia Wittkopp’s lab where I assisted in a project mapping point mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to explore the dynamics of gene regulatory networks. I also pursued a project with Dr. Milford Wolpoff and Dr. Abigail Bigham examining the rates of Neandertal introgression in genic versus intergenic regions of the human genome using the 1000 Genomes dataset.

My work currently focuses on the house mice Mus musculus musculus and Mus musculus domesticus, which form a natural hybrid zone in Europe, and understanding the basis of reproductive isolation between them.

Presentations

Katya Mack, Amy Goldberg, Abigail Bigham. Rates of Neandertal introgression in genic versus intergenic regions of the human genome

Amy Goldberg, Katya Mack, Abigail Bigham. 2012 American Association of Physical Anthropologists. A genetic perspective on the evolution of longevity at the Middle Paleolithic to Upper Paleolithic transition